just me, kimi


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Anyone who has ever struggled with poverty knows how extremely expensive it is to be poor.
— "Fifth Avenue, Uptown: a Letter from Harlem" in Esquire (July 1960); republished in Nobody Knows My Name: More Notes of a Native Son (1961)

Source: jessehimself

The joy that you give to others is the joy that comes back to you.
— John Greenleaf Whittier (via observando)
aimexico:

La violencia contra las personas migrantes que viajan a través de nuestro país debe terminar ya. Exige un alto a la violencia e impunidad en: www.alzatuvoz.org/migrantes

aimexico:

La violencia contra las personas migrantes que viajan a través de nuestro país debe terminar ya. 

Exige un alto a la violencia e impunidad en: www.alzatuvoz.org/migrantes

Source: aimexico

i once saw a scientist
on television.
and she was speaking generally
about science things
(being a scientist and knowing science things
etc.)
and, speaking generally
i am not a science
person,
and while i respect them,
i do not have much interest
in scientists
or science things.
so i went to switch the channel
at the precise moment that the presenter sitting beside the scientist asked:
what,
in your opinion,
is the most ASTOUNDING fact
about the universe
?
and this stopped me.
because it is not often that television presenters ask such interesting questions,
and the scientist was pursing her lips in a thoughtful way that made me think
i wanted to her her answer
to the interesting question.
after a pause,
she did not look directly at the
camera,
but directly at the presenter.

did you know,
she said,
that there are atoms in your body.
the presenter laughed.
of course,
he said.
what else would my body be made of?

well,
said the scientist,
and i did not need to look at the television screen to know
she was smiling.
do you know where those atoms came from?
well,
said the presenter.
and he did not say anything else.
i snickered from my place in the armchair
and the scientist smiled again.

the most ASTOUNDING fact that i have ever known,
she said,
is not a fact, specifically,
but the story of every atom on this planet.
the ones that make up the grass and the sea and the sand and the forests and the human
body.
these atoms came
from stars.

the presenter sat forward and so did i.

stars,
continued the scientist,
are mortal
like humans.
they die,
and, in their later years,
are unstable.
it pains me a little to say it, but a star’s death
is far more dramatic than a human’s.
is it? asked the presenter.
the scientist was looking at him still,
and i felt strongly as though i was listening in on a very private
conversation.

it is, the scientist nodded. the stars
i am referring to,
she said,
collapsed and exploded a very long time ago, and scattered their enriched guts across
the entire universe.
here, she paused, and her words caught in my mind in a way that made me wonder
if she was a scientist
or a poet.
their guts, she said whilst sipping from a glass of water, were splayed across every
inch
of time and space.
these guts were made of the
fundamental ingredients
of life and existence.
carbon and oxygen and nitrogen and hydrogen and all the
rest of it.
all in the bellies of these stars that flung themselves across the universe in protest when it was their time to die.

and then? asked the presenter.
the scientist’s lips quirked upwards. and then, she said.
it all became parts of gas clouds.
ones that condense and collapse and will form our next solar systems -
billions of stars with billions of planets to orbit them.
and these planets have the ingredients of life sewed into the very fabric
of their own lives.

so, she said, smile still playing on her lips -
where do your atoms come from?
from those gas clouds, said the presenter.
no, said the scientist.
from those stars.

every atom, every molecule, every inhale and exhale and beat of your heart, is traceable
to the crucibles that cooked life itself.
and you are sitting here and so am i and so are your viewers at home,
and we’re all in the universe, aren’t we?
yes, said the presenter.
but i’ll tell you what’s even better, the scientist smiled wider.
the universe is in us. your atoms and my atoms and your camera men’s atoms came from those stars. you’re connected and relevant without even having to try. you are made of stardust and the fabric of the universe.
that is the most ASTOUNDING fact
i can tell you.
the presenter smiled and the scientist smiled wider and i smiled too,

and later i switched the channel to something less scientific
and wondered if i should feel small,
tiny and insignificant in relation to the stars that collapsed and exploded and
threw themselves everywhere.
and that is how my mother found me,
sitting on the sofa.
and she asked me what was
wrong,
and i said,
nothing. i’m just a lot smaller than stars are.
my mother is very literal woman. as such, her natural response was:
of course you’re not. don’t you see how small stars are?
that’s only from a distance,
i said.
maybe you’re looking at yourself from a distance too, she said.

and she left the room and it is years later now, but i still
think about the scientist and what she said
and my mother and what she said
and i still see the presenter on television.
and i still think that the stars are very big
but now i think,
they are in me.
so i am big too.

'the most astounding fact' - j.c., inspired by neil degrass tyson’s talk of the same name (via girlonfired)

xiaoyunsmiles

(via takemetheresomeday)

Source: girlonfired

I wonder who types out the closed captions on tv. And why is it called CLOSED captions?

girlwiththepurpleframes:

this is the best thing I’ve ever seen

girlwiththepurpleframes:

this is the best thing I’ve ever seen

Source: neoliberalismkills

fatnutritionist:

atheistxmas:

kingtrinbago:

The Greatest Thing Since Sliced Bread

Holy balls.

Do you feel my heart beating, do you understand

Source: kingtrinbago

fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers:

These things actually permeate your brain and plant little seeds that people then carry around with them and influence how they behave. And it’s so important to analyze this, especially when you have an audience of MILLIONS.

Here’s Why Racism’s Not “Just Comedy” - Chescaleigh

Source: fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers

Source: the-hippie-owl

Source: cappstreetcrap

Source: behindclosed-eyelids

If Latin America had not been pillaged by the U.S. capital since its independence, millions of desperate workers would not now be coming here in such numbers to reclaim a share of that wealth; and if the United States is today the world’s richest nation, it is in part because of the sweat and blood of the copper workers of Chile, the tin miners of Bolivia, the fruit pickers of Guatemala and Honduras, the cane cutters of Cuba, the oil workers of Venezuela and Mexico, the pharmaceutical workers of Puerto Rico, the ranch hands of Costa Rica and Argentina, the West Indians who died building the Panama Canal, and the Panamanians who maintained it.
— Juan Gonzalez - Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America (via anything-for-selenas)

Source: anything-for-selenas

“Dying to your own attachments is a beautiful death. Because this death release you into real life. You have to die as a seed to live as a tree.”

- Mooji

Source: painting-a-picture

Source: jenndlv

phoenix-falls:

queereyes-queerminds:

lostruth:

Power Structure of Oppression

Yes. Yes. YES. 

I’m just gonna leave this here, in case anyone thought their fee fees were more important than systematic oppression 

phoenix-falls:

queereyes-queerminds:

lostruth:

Power Structure of Oppression

Yes. Yes. YES. 

I’m just gonna leave this here, in case anyone thought their fee fees were more important than systematic oppression 

Source: coraxon